Taxon:
Ciconia ciconia

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Scientific Name
Ciconia ciconia
Common Name
White Stork
Taxa Group
Ciconiidae
Environment
Move Mode

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 18
  • Data package
    Data from: Individual environmental niches in mobile organisms
    (2021-02-19) Carlson, Ben; Rotics, Shay; Nathan, Ran; Wikelski, Martin; Jetz, Walter
    Individual variation is increasingly recognized as a central component of ecological processes, but its role in structuring environmental niche associations remains largely unknown. Species’ responses to environmental conditions are ultimately determined by the niches of single individuals, yet environmental associations are typically captured only at the level of species. Here, we develop scenarios for how individual variation may combine to define the compound environmental niche of populations, use extensive movement data to document individual environmental niche variation, test associated hypotheses of niche configuration, and examine the consistency of individual niches over time. For 45 individual white storks (Ciconia ciconia; 116 individual-year combinations), we uncover high variability in individual environmental associations, consistency of individual niches over time, and moderate to strong niche specialization. Within populations, environmental niches follow a nested pattern, with individuals arranged along a specialist-to-generalist gradient. These results reject common assumptions of individual niche equivalency among conspecifics, as well as the separation of individual niches into disparate parts of environmental space. These findings underscore the need for a more thorough consideration of individualistic environmental responses in global change research.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork Sicily"
    (2021-12-10) Grasso, Rosario; Gagliardo, Anna; Zafarana, Manuel; Müller, Ingetraud; Schmid, Heidi; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Wikelski, Martin
    1. Quantifying movement and demographic events of free-ranging animals is fundamental to studying their ecology, evolution and conservation. Technological advances have led to an explosion in sensor-based methods for remotely observing these phenomena. This transition to big data creates new challenges for data management, analysis and collaboration. 2. We present the Movebank ecosystem of tools used by thousands of researchers to collect, manage, share, visualize, analyse and archive their animal tracking and other animal-borne sensor data. Users add sensor data through file uploads or live data streams and further organize and complete quality control within the Movebank system. All data are harmonized to a data model and vocabulary. The public can discover, view and download data for which they have been given access to through the website, the Animal Tracker mobile app or by API. Advanced analysis tools are available through the EnvDATA System, the MoveApps platform and a variety of user-developed applications. Data owners can share studies with select users or the public, with options for embargos, licenses and formal archiving in a data repository. 3. Movebank is used by over 3,100 data owners globally, who manage over 6 billion animal location and sensor measurements across more than 6,500 studies, with thousands of active tags sending over 3 million new data records daily. These data underlie >700 published papers and reports. We present a case study demonstrating the use of Movebank to assess life-history events and demography, and engage with citizen scientists to identify mortalities and causes of death for a migratory bird. 4. A growing number of researchers, government agencies and conservation organizations use Movebank to manage research and conservation projects and to meet legislative requirements. The combination of historic and new data with collaboration tools enables broad comparative analyses and data acquisition and mapping efforts. Movebank offers an integrated system for real-time monitoring of animals at a global scale and represents a digital museum of animal movement and behaviour. Resources and coordination across countries and organizations are needed to ensure that these data, including those that cannot be made public, remain accessible to future generations.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork Vorarlberg" (2016-2019)
    (2019-07-23) Fiedler, Wolfgang; Niederer, Walter; Schönenberger, Alwin; Flack, Andrea; Wikelski, Martin
    Human-induced changes in climate and environment are challenging the existence of migratory species. Species with diverse and flexible migratory behaviour suffer less from population decline, as they are more capable to respond by altering migratory behaviour. At the individual-level, variations in migratory behaviour may lead to differences in fitness and subsequently influence demographic dynamics. Using lifetime GPS bio-logging data from 169 white storks (Ciconia ciconia), we answer whether their recently shortened migration has survival benefit during the juvenile stage, the riskiest life period for many migrants. We also explore how other variations in migratory decisions (i.e. time, destination), movement activity (measured by the overall body dynamic acceleration), and early life conditions influence juveniles’ survival. We observed that first autumn migration was the riskiest period for juvenile white storks. Individuals that migrated shorter distances and fledged earlier experienced lower mortality risk. In addition, higher movement activity and overwintering “closer-to-home” in Europe and North Africa (84.21% of tracked individuals adopted this new strategy) were associated with higher survival. Our study shows how avian migrants can change life history decisions linked to fitness over few decades and thus helps us to understand and predict how migrants respond to the changing world.
  • Data package
    Data from: Early arrival at breeding grounds: causes, costs and a trade-off with overwintering latitude
    (2018-09-14) Rotics, Shay; Kaatz, Michael; Turjeman, Sondra; Zurell, Damaris; Wikelski, Martin; Sapir, Nir; Eggers, Ute; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Jeltsch, Florian; Nathan, Ran
    (1) Early arrival at breeding grounds is of prime importance for migrating birds as it is known to enhance breeding success. Adults, males and higher quality individuals typically arrive earlier, and across years, early arrival has been linked to warmer spring temperatures. However, the mechanisms and potential costs of early arrival are not well understood. (2) To deepen the understanding of arrival date differences between individuals and years, we studied them in light of the preceding spring migration behaviour and atmospheric conditions en route. (3) GPS and body‐acceleration (ACC) data were obtained for 35 adult white storks (Ciconia ciconia) over five years (2012‐2016). ACC records were translated to energy expenditure estimates (Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration; ODBA) and to behavioural modes, and GPS fixes were coupled with environmental parameters. (4) At the inter‐individual level (within years), early arrival was attributed primarily to departing earlier for migration and from more northern wintering sites (closer to breeding grounds), rather than to migration speed. In fact, early departing birds flew slower, experienced weaker thermal uplifts and expended more energy during flight, but still arrived earlier, emphasizing the cost and the significance of early departure. Individuals that wintered further south arrived later at the breeding grounds but did not produce fewer fledglings, presumably due to positive carry‐over effects of advantageous wintering conditions (increased precipitation, vegetation productivity and daylight time). Therefore, early arrival increased breeding success only after controlling for wintering latitude. Males arrived slightly ahead of females. Between years, late arrival was linked to colder temperatures en route through two different mechanisms: stronger headwinds causing slower migration and lower thermal uplifts resulting in longer stopovers. (5) This study showed that distinct migratory properties underlie arrival time variation within and between years. It highlighted: (a) an overlooked cost of early arrival induced by unfavourable atmospheric conditions during migration, (b) an important fitness trade‐off in storks between arrival date and wintering habitat quality, and (c) mechanistic explanations for the negative temperature‐arrival date correlation in soaring birds. Such understanding of arrival time can facilitate forecasting migrating species responses to climate changes.
  • Data package
    Data from: Wind estimation based on thermal soaring of birds
    (2017-11-30) Flack, Andrea; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Wikelski, Martin
    NOTE: An updated and larger version of this dataset is available. See doi:10.5441/001/1.ck04mn78. ABSTRACT: The flight performance of birds is strongly affected by the dynamic state of the atmosphere at the birds' locations. Studies of flight and its impact on the movement ecology of birds must consider the wind to help us understand aerodynamics and bird flight strategies. Here, we introduce a systematic approach to evaluate wind speed and direction from the high-frequency GPS recordings from bird-borne tags during thermalling flight. Our method assumes that a fixed horizontal mean wind speed during a short (18 seconds, 19 GPS fixes) flight segment with a constant turn angle along a closed loop, characteristic of thermalling flight, will generate a fixed drift for each consequent location. We use a maximum-likelihood approach to estimate that drift and to determine the wind and airspeeds at the birds' flight locations. We also provide error estimates for these GPS-derived wind speed estimates. We validate our approach by comparing its wind estimates with the mid-resolution weather reanalysis data from ECMWF, and by examining independent wind estimates from pairs of birds in a large dataset of GPS-tagged migrating storks that were flying in close proximity. Our approach provides accurate and unbiased observations of wind speed and additional detailed information on vertical winds and uplift structure. These precise measurements are otherwise rare and hard to obtain and will broaden our understanding of atmospheric conditions, flight aerodynamics, and bird flight strategies. With an increasing number of GPS-tracked animals, we may soon be able to use birds to inform us about the atmosphere they are flying through and thus improve future ecological and environmental studies.
  • Data package
    Data from: Costs of migratory decisions: a comparison across eight white stork populations
    (2015-06-13) Flack, Andrea; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Blas, Julio; Pokrovski, Ivan; Mitropolsky, B.; Kaatz, Michael; Aghababyan, Karen; Khachatryan, A.; Fakriadis, Ioannis; Makrigianni, Eleni; Jerzak, Leszek; Shamin, M.; Shamina, C.; Azafzaf, H.; Feltrup-Azafzaf, Claudia; Mokotjomela, Thabiso M.; Wikelski, Martin
    Annual migratory movements can range from a few tens to thousands of kilometers, creating unique energetic requirements for each specific species and journey. Even within the same species, migration costs can vary largely because of flexible, opportunistic life history strategies. We uncover the large extent of variation in the lifetime migratory decisions of young white storks originating from eight populations. Not only did juvenile storks differ in their geographically distinct wintering locations, their diverse migration patterns also affected the amount of energy individuals invested for locomotion during the first months of their life. Overwintering in areas with higher human population reduced the stork’s overall energy expenditure because of shorter daily foraging trips, closer wintering grounds, or a complete suppression of migration. Because migrants can change ecological processes in several distinct communities simultaneously, understanding their life history decisions helps not only to protect migratory species but also to conserve stable ecosystems.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork SW Germany" (2013-2019)
    (2019-07-23) Fiedler, Wolfgang; Flack, Andrea; Schäfle, Wolfgang; Keeves, Brigitta; Quetting, Michael; Eid, Babette; Schmid, Heidi; Wikelski, Martin
    Human-induced changes in climate and environment are challenging the existence of migratory species. Species with diverse and flexible migratory behaviour suffer less from population decline, as they are more capable to respond by altering migratory behaviour. At the individual-level, variations in migratory behaviour may lead to differences in fitness and subsequently influence demographic dynamics. Using lifetime GPS bio-logging data from 169 white storks (Ciconia ciconia), we answer whether their recently shortened migration has survival benefit during the juvenile stage, the riskiest life period for many migrants. We also explore how other variations in migratory decisions (i.e. time, destination), movement activity (measured by the overall body dynamic acceleration), and early life conditions influence juveniles’ survival. We observed that first autumn migration was the riskiest period for juvenile white storks. Individuals that migrated shorter distances and fledged earlier experienced lower mortality risk. In addition, higher movement activity and overwintering “closer-to-home” in Europe and North Africa (84.21% of tracked individuals adopted this new strategy) were associated with higher survival. Our study shows how avian migrants can change life history decisions linked to fitness over few decades and thus helps us to understand and predict how migrants respond to the changing world.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork Kosova"
    (2021-12-10) Maxhuni, Qenan; Gashi, Agim; Hoxha, Liridon; Wolf, Gregor; Fiedler, Wolfgang
    1. Quantifying movement and demographic events of free-ranging animals is fundamental to studying their ecology, evolution and conservation. Technological advances have led to an explosion in sensor-based methods for remotely observing these phenomena. This transition to big data creates new challenges for data management, analysis and collaboration. 2. We present the Movebank ecosystem of tools used by thousands of researchers to collect, manage, share, visualize, analyse and archive their animal tracking and other animal-borne sensor data. Users add sensor data through file uploads or live data streams and further organize and complete quality control within the Movebank system. All data are harmonized to a data model and vocabulary. The public can discover, view and download data for which they have been given access to through the website, the Animal Tracker mobile app or by API. Advanced analysis tools are available through the EnvDATA System, the MoveApps platform and a variety of user-developed applications. Data owners can share studies with select users or the public, with options for embargos, licenses and formal archiving in a data repository. 3. Movebank is used by over 3,100 data owners globally, who manage over 6 billion animal location and sensor measurements across more than 6,500 studies, with thousands of active tags sending over 3 million new data records daily. These data underlie >700 published papers and reports. We present a case study demonstrating the use of Movebank to assess life-history events and demography, and engage with citizen scientists to identify mortalities and causes of death for a migratory bird. 4. A growing number of researchers, government agencies and conservation organizations use Movebank to manage research and conservation projects and to meet legislative requirements. The combination of historic and new data with collaboration tools enables broad comparative analyses and data acquisition and mapping efforts. Movebank offers an integrated system for real-time monitoring of animals at a global scale and represents a digital museum of animal movement and behaviour. Resources and coordination across countries and organizations are needed to ensure that these data, including those that cannot be made public, remain accessible to future generations.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork Oberschwaben" (2014-2019)
    (2019-07-23) Fiedler, Wolfgang; Flack, Andrea; Schmidt, Andreas; Reinhard, Ute; Wikelski, Martin
    Human-induced changes in climate and environment are challenging the existence of migratory species. Species with diverse and flexible migratory behaviour suffer less from population decline, as they are more capable to respond by altering migratory behaviour. At the individual-level, variations in migratory behaviour may lead to differences in fitness and subsequently influence demographic dynamics. Using lifetime GPS bio-logging data from 169 white storks (Ciconia ciconia), we answer whether their recently shortened migration has survival benefit during the juvenile stage, the riskiest life period for many migrants. We also explore how other variations in migratory decisions (i.e. time, destination), movement activity (measured by the overall body dynamic acceleration), and early life conditions influence juveniles’ survival. We observed that first autumn migration was the riskiest period for juvenile white storks. Individuals that migrated shorter distances and fledged earlier experienced lower mortality risk. In addition, higher movement activity and overwintering “closer-to-home” in Europe and North Africa (84.21% of tracked individuals adopted this new strategy) were associated with higher survival. Our study shows how avian migrants can change life history decisions linked to fitness over few decades and thus helps us to understand and predict how migrants respond to the changing world.
  • Data package
    Data from: Study "LifeTrack White Stork Bavaria" (2014-2019)
    (2019-07-23) Fiedler, Wolfgang; Leppelsack, Elke; Leppelsack, Hans; Stahl, Thomas; Wieding, Oda; Wikelski, Martin
    Human-induced changes in climate and environment are challenging the existence of migratory species. Species with diverse and flexible migratory behaviour suffer less from population decline, as they are more capable to respond by altering migratory behaviour. At the individual-level, variations in migratory behaviour may lead to differences in fitness and subsequently influence demographic dynamics. Using lifetime GPS bio-logging data from 169 white storks (Ciconia ciconia), we answer whether their recently shortened migration has survival benefit during the juvenile stage, the riskiest life period for many migrants. We also explore how other variations in migratory decisions (i.e. time, destination), movement activity (measured by the overall body dynamic acceleration), and early life conditions influence juveniles’ survival. We observed that first autumn migration was the riskiest period for juvenile white storks. Individuals that migrated shorter distances and fledged earlier experienced lower mortality risk. In addition, higher movement activity and overwintering “closer-to-home” in Europe and North Africa (84.21% of tracked individuals adopted this new strategy) were associated with higher survival. Our study shows how avian migrants can change life history decisions linked to fitness over few decades and thus helps us to understand and predict how migrants respond to the changing world.